How can humans, machines and artificial intelligence become partners in the workplace?

AI is fundamentally changing the future of work and making. Autodesk Toronto is exploring the impact of AI through a series of events led by Autodesk experts.

How can humans, machines and artificial intelligence become partners in the workplace?

Recent developments in AI have painted unsettling pictures of potentially negative effects of both displacement and replacement of humans by machines. While technological development has always been part of a much larger continuum of change, much of this debate is attributed to recent breakthroughs in algorithms ability to emulate various cognitive capabilities. Particularly, the last two centuries are chock full of examples of when disruptive technologies fuelled uncertainty with some extreme cases even leading to civil strife.

Nonetheless, history has shown that we have always adapted, and so has our economy and workforce. There are certainly lessons to learn from our past, but we cannot simply treat history as a paradigm to avoid difficult questions and tasks that lay ahead of us. The future of work is about how we will navigate the new change while identifying opportunities for innovation and growth. According to the World Economic Forum, “We need jobs for the hundred millions of unemployed people around the world, and we need the skilled employees that businesses are struggling to find.”

Within this context, education and learning are critical topics we need to address to navigate our way into the future. So we ask, what are some of the new pathways in learning? And how could new world of learning help us embrace the complexities of constant disruption? What will higher education look like next year…or 10 years from now? Are our schools and universities ready to respond to the disruption that is already changing the jobs we do, and how and where we work?

To tackle these questions, Dr. Randy Swearer, VP Global Education Team at Autodesk, presented Autodesk’s point of view on the future of education and work to a crowd of 350+ attendees at Autodesk Toronto’s office at MaRS Discovery District. Randy was joined by Sean Stanleigh, Managing Editor from the Globe and Mail, who moderated an engaging discussion followed by an extensive set of questions posed by the audience.

Photo: Randy Swearer, VP Global Education Team, presenting at MaRS Discovery District; New Home of Autodesk in Toronto, Canada. May 2017.

Autodesk Toronto AI series is poised to establish Autodesk’s thought leadership within one of the fastest growing AI clusters in the world known as Vector Institute to be housed adjacent to Autodesk’s office at MaRS Discovery, Toronto. Vector Institute is the latest in Canada’s AI expansion propelled by $180 million investment from government and industries.

The first of AI series was held last February with a focus on design and manufacturing. Mike Haley, Sr. Director of Machine Intelligence at Autodesk Research, provided an overview of how new advancements in AI are ushering a new age of “hypercreativity”. You can view a recorded clip of Mike’s talk here.

Photo: Mike Haley, Sr. Director of Machine Intelligence at Autodesk, presenting at MaRS Discovery District; New Home of Autodesk in Toronto, Canada. Feb 2017.